Health Advice
Gastroenteritis
Precautions to be taken to avoid Gastroenteritis

Following heavy rainfalls on the country, there is a potential risk of increased gastrointestinal infections due to contamination of drinking water and food. As a result, the ministry advises the public to maintain the following precautions to avoid any risk of catching gastroenteritis:

• Boil the water before drinking.
• Wash hands thoroughly with soap and water
• Consume freshly cooked meals
• Wash fruits and vegetables well before consuming them
• Cover food to protect against insect contamination

Ebola
The World Health Organization (WHO) has declared the end of the recent resurgence of Ebola virus disease in Guinea-Conakry. Following this declaration, the Ministry of Health and Quality of Life informs the public that Guinea-Conakry has been removed from the list of countries affected by the Ebola.

It is noted that Liberia and Sierra Leone have already been removed from the list of Ebola Virus Disease on April 11, 2016. Thus, there are no more restrictions on traveling to these country.

Malaria
Malaria is a deadly mosquito-borne disease afflicting as many as 500 million people in 106 countries in Africa, Asia and Latin America. It is estimated that, annually, the disease causes nearly one million deaths. In Africa a child dies every 45 seconds of Malaria, the disease accounting for 20% of all childhood deaths.

Malaria is caused by a parasite called Plasmodium of which four types are known to cause disease in humans, namely,
• Plasmodium falciparum
• Plasmodium vivax
• Plasmodium malariae
• Plasmodium ovale.

Dengue
Dengue fever is a viral infection transmitted by mosquitoes in the tropics and subtropics of the world, including Mauritius. In Mauritius, the mosquito Aedes albopictus is responsible for the transmission of dengue fever. The virus is transmitted to humans by the bite of the infected female.

For more information, contact the Communicable Disease Control Unit (CDCU) of the Ministry of Health and Quality of Life on the following number: Weekday from 09H00 to 16H00: 8924

Plague
Madagascar is currently experiencing an outbreak of plague in the major cities such as Antananarivo.

Causative Agent
FPlague is an infectious disease caused by the bacteria Yersinia pestis, a bacterium, which is usually present in wild rodents and fleas.

Source of Infection and Transmission
It is transmitted:
• To humans by the bite of infected rat fleas
• Direct contact with infected rats
• Person to person through respiratory droplets from a patient having pneumonic plague

High temperatures during the summer season
In anticipation of high temperatures during the summer season, the public is advised to take the following precautions:

• Consume at least two liters of water a day. People doing work in the sun, must consume more.
• Control the temperature and humidity in the home and office through a ventilation or air conditioning system.
• Stay in the shade as often as possible, especially at midday.
• Wear light or loose colored clothing, preferably of cotton or absorbent material.
• Wear a cloth cap or hat before going out in the sun.
• A broad spectrum sunscreen can be applied before being exposed to the sun.
• Do not allow children to expose themselves to the sun for a long time.
• Older people are advised to drink water regularly without waiting for thirst and to avoid going out during the hottest hours.

Yellow Fever
A yellow fever vaccination certificate is required for travellers over 1 year of age coming from infected areas. The countries and areas included in the endemic zones are considered as infected areas. A list of these countries is as hereunder

Africa

America

Angola

Bolivia

Benin

Brazil

Burkina, Faso      

Colombia      

Burundi           

Ecuador        

Cameroon           

French Guiana

Central African Republic     

Guyana

Chad           

Panama

Congo    

Peru

Cote d’Ivoire   

Surinam

Democratic Republic of Congo   

Venezuela

Equatorial Guinea 

 

Ethiopia

 

Gabon

 

Gambia

 

Ghana

 

Guinea

 

Guinea-Bissau

 

Kenya

 

Liberia

 

Mali

 

Niger

 

Nigeria

 

Rwanda

 

Sad Tome and Principe

 

Senegal

 

Sierra Leone

 

Somalia

 

Sudan

 

Togo

 

Uganda

 

United Republic of Tanzania

 

Zambia

 ​



It should be pointed out that the Vaccination Certificate for Yellow Fever is valid ten (10) days after the date of vaccination, or in case of revaccination as from the date of revaccination.

HEPATITIS A, TYPHOID
The prevalence of these diseases is very low. There is no need to have any vaccinations against these diseases when proceeding to the country.

POLIOMYELITIS
No cases of Poliomyelitis has been reported since the early sixties.

FILARIASIS
No filariasis in Mauritius.

RABIES
No Rabies in Mauritius.

CHIKUNGNYA AND DENGUE
Chikungunya and Dengue are both important viral diseases that are transmitted by day-biting mosquitoes. The principal vectors that transmit both diseases are mosquitoes of the genus Aedes .In Mauritius; it is Aedes albopictus which is the local vector

Chikungunya

Operational Plan for the Prevention and Control of Chikungunya and Dengue in The Republic of Mauritius: